Allspice – Great Spice…Best Oil

Ladies and gentlemen! Let me introduce you to this prolific herb…spice…oil or call it whatever you fancy…Allspice…

This spice is definitely the daddy of all other known herbs and spices known to mankind…Reason being…Consider it to be a human being with innumerable hands to do innumerable chores…Yes! This is one spice that can carry out myriad tasks for our good…

Also…Allspice can be substituted for cloves in many recipes…

For a flavorful peppercorn mixture for your peppermill, add whole allspice berries in equal proportions to green, black, and white peppercorns…

I’ll give some quick tips regarding this prolific spice…the oil…

To further intensify the flavor and aroma of whole allspice berries, place them on a cookie sheet and roast in a 350-degree F. oven until they begin to smell, about 10 minutes. Achieve the same effect by using a heavy dry fry pan on the stovetop, shaking often over medium-high heat for about 5 minutes. Watch carefully so they do not burn and become bitter. Cool before using.

When using allspice in yeast breads, limit the amount to 1/4 teaspoon per cup of flour.

The allspice can inhibit the activity of the yeast in large amounts.

6 whole allspice berries = 1/4 to 1/2 tsp ground allspice.

1 teaspoon ground allspice = 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon plus 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves.

When it comes to its storage…Store allspice in an airtight container in a cool, dark place, and never near a hot stove or vent…As with most spices, ground allspice will begin to lose flavor after six months…So always remember…The whole berries should be used within one year…

If you have arrived here via a search engine, do not miss the full article on Allspice which includes history, storage, usage, and cooking tips…Allspice is a popular spice in Caribbean and Latin savoury dishes as well as in desserts. The flavour is akin to a mixture of cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves with a hint of juniper berry. When your recipe calls for ground allspice, grind your own fresh from the whole berries for the most intense flavour…

Okay…Now quickly go through our reference links…

  1. Allspice Oil by All Recipes
  2. Allspice essential Oil by Gernot
  3. Allspice Oil by Organic

Super Spice – Allspice

You know why I call this amazingly unusual spice super?

Well…trust me it deserves to be addressed as no less…Reason being that this spice is bizarre! One moment it can put your tongue on fire and the other it makes you drool over the best dessert in which it is added…getting my point? See…this is just one of its kind spice that is great when added to spicy dished and equally amazing when added to desserts…How this thing happens…Read on to find…

Allspice, botanically-known as Pimenta officinalis, is native to Central and South America, but is most closely associated with the West Indies island of Jamaica…Jamaica exports the majority of allspice for consumption around the world, so it’s no wonder that most classic Jamaican dishes such as jerk seasoning and beef patties make generous use of this spice…

Allspice is the dried berry of the Jamaican pepper tree, also known as pimento tree. At first glance, you might easily confuse the allspice berry with a peppercorn, just as early Spanish explorers did.

The green berries, which contain two seeds, are slightly larger than peppercorns and have a rough dark reddish brown exterior when dried…They are harvested and dried when they reach full size but before they mature. The allspice berries lose their flavour and aroma when fully ripe.

Allspice comes by its name for a very good reason. The berries have a combined flavour of cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves with a hint of juniper and peppercorn. Some enterprising spice companies sell a mixture of spices as allspice, so be sure and check the ingredients on the label to be sure you are getting the real thing. Allspice is often called pimento, not to be confused with the capsicum pepper pimiento, which is a vegetable, not a spice.

Allspice holds a prominent place in Caribbean and Latin savoury and sweet dishes. It is also an important ingredient in –

  • Spice mixes
  • Pickles
  • Chutneys
  • Vegetables
  • Soups
  • Desserts

Allspice is available in ground form as well as whole berries. When ground allspice is called for in a recipe, choose whole berries and grind them yourself in a peppermill, spice grinder, or mortar and pestle for the freshest and most intense flavour…

Okay…Now have a look at our references…

  1. Allspice Oil by Organic
  2. Allspice by All Recipes
  3. Allspice Essential Oil by Gernot